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Cropwell Bishop Creamery

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Cropwell Bishop Creamery

Blue Stilton is one of the most tasty, traditional and worldwide known British cheeses. This cheese is so highly regarded that it is one of a handful of British varieties to have been granted protected trademark status be the European Commission. Only Stilton made from pasteurised cow’s milk in Derbyshire, Nottinghamshire and Leicestershire can legally use the name, and there are just six dairies in the world licenced to make Stilton cheese.

The Blue Stilton you get from Hay Hampers is produced by Cropwell Bishop in Nottinghamshire, the last family owned Stilton producers in the UK with more than 160 years of cheese making experience.

Over the years Cropwell Bishop have won many awards including Supreme Champion Cheese at the prestigious Nantwich international Cheese Show.

The milk is supplied to Cropwell Bishop creamery by just 15 family run local farms. Once the milk has been received the Head cheese maker, Mario sets to work. It takes 136 pints of milk (78 litres) to make one 17lb (8kg) Stilton cheese. Once formed,  the cheese cylinders called truckles are stored in maturing rooms for about 5 weeks. Then they are pierced to allow oxygen into the cheese enabling the blue mould to develop and give the cheese it’s characteristic ‘veiny’ appearance. Piercing is repeated a week later, before each cheese is individually graded, packaged and dispatched.

Stilton is still made in much the same way as it was when Daniel Defoe, writing his ‘Tour through England and Wales’ in 1727, remarked that he “pass’d Stilton, a town famous for cheese, which is call’d our English parmesan, and is brought to table with the mites, or maggots round it, so thick, that they bring a spoon with them for you to eat the mites with, as you do the cheese” And yet Stilton was never made in the town of Stilton!

Stilton is situated on the old Great North Road. In the 18th century , the town was a staging post for coaches travelling to and from London to York. The horses would be changed and traveller served light refreshments at one of the town’s hostelries. Cooper Thornhill, an East Midlands entrepreneur, was landlord at the famous Bell Inn and it was he who introduced travellers to the soft, creamy, blue veined cheese which subsequently took its name from the town. Thornhill had bought the cheese from a farmer’s wife by the name of Frances Pawlett who lived near Melton Mowbray. Today the mites have gone but the Stilton remains.

Stilton is best consumed at room temperature. It is perfectly matched to a sweet and weighty wine either Port, a dry Sherry or a claret work well. 

Cropwell Bishop Creamery

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Cropwell Bishop Creamery logo

Cropwell Bishop Banner

Cropwell Bishop Creamery

Blue Stilton is one of the most tasty, traditional and worldwide known British cheeses. This cheese is so highly regarded that it is one of a handful of British varieties to have been granted protected trademark status be the European Commission. Only Stilton made from pasteurised cow’s milk in Derbyshire, Nottinghamshire and Leicestershire can legally use the name, and there are just six dairies in the world licenced to make Stilton cheese.

The Blue Stilton you get from Hay Hampers is produced by Cropwell Bishop in Nottinghamshire, the last family owned Stilton producers in the UK with more than 160 years of cheese making experience.

Over the years Cropwell Bishop have won many awards including Supreme Champion Cheese at the prestigious Nantwich international Cheese Show.

The milk is supplied to Cropwell Bishop creamery by just 15 family run local farms. Once the milk has been received the Head cheese maker, Mario sets to work. It takes 136 pints of milk (78 litres) to make one 17lb (8kg) Stilton cheese. Once formed,  the cheese cylinders called truckles are stored in maturing rooms for about 5 weeks. Then they are pierced to allow oxygen into the cheese enabling the blue mould to develop and give the cheese it’s characteristic ‘veiny’ appearance. Piercing is repeated a week later, before each cheese is individually graded, packaged and dispatched.

Stilton is still made in much the same way as it was when Daniel Defoe, writing his ‘Tour through England and Wales’ in 1727, remarked that he “pass’d Stilton, a town famous for cheese, which is call’d our English parmesan, and is brought to table with the mites, or maggots round it, so thick, that they bring a spoon with them for you to eat the mites with, as you do the cheese” And yet Stilton was never made in the town of Stilton!

Stilton is situated on the old Great North Road. In the 18th century , the town was a staging post for coaches travelling to and from London to York. The horses would be changed and traveller served light refreshments at one of the town’s hostelries. Cooper Thornhill, an East Midlands entrepreneur, was landlord at the famous Bell Inn and it was he who introduced travellers to the soft, creamy, blue veined cheese which subsequently took its name from the town. Thornhill had bought the cheese from a farmer’s wife by the name of Frances Pawlett who lived near Melton Mowbray. Today the mites have gone but the Stilton remains.

Stilton is best consumed at room temperature. It is perfectly matched to a sweet and weighty wine either Port, a dry Sherry or a claret work well.